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gapers:

Water dribbling over the top gives the figure a lifelike, freshly dropped glisten—another sign of Kenar’s craftsmanship in service of his impish sense of humor.
Zoom In: East Village | Zoom in | Chicago

gapers:

Water dribbling over the top gives the figure a lifelike, freshly dropped glisten—another sign of Kenar’s craftsmanship in service of his impish sense of humor.

Zoom In: East Village | Zoom in | Chicago


rebeccataylorny:

Anri Sala’s “Clocked Perspective” in Piet Oudolf’s stunning Open Field” at @hauserwirth. #artswoon #teamfitz (at Hauser & Wirth Somerset)

rebeccataylorny:

Anri Sala’s “Clocked Perspective” in Piet Oudolf’s stunning Open Field” at @hauserwirth. #artswoon #teamfitz (at Hauser & Wirth Somerset)


hirshhornconservation:

All sculptures begin to change from the moment the object leaves the artist’s studio. In the case of outdoor works, natural aging and the physical impact of light, temperature, humidity, air pollution, and handling all take their toll. Nonetheless, there are many benefits to viewing works of art outdoors; visitors can experience the works in a unique context in combination with foliage, architecture and even the weather. While viewing sculpture in an outdoor context can bring new meaning and depth to the visitors’ experience, these benefits must be navigated relative to the risks the works face from the effects of the elements, animals, and human interactions. Much of the Hirshhorn Museum’s outdoor sculpture conservation internship may at first sight appear to be routine, but the preventative measures that we carry out are essential in minimizing deterioration.
It may be surprising that massive sculptures made of steel or bronze are vulnerable to the elements. Yet, when bare metals are exposed to moisture and air pollution, corrosion can begin, gradually weakening and degrading the metal and putting the sculpture at risk from structural failure. Rain water can also pool in low areas and crevices and, as pools evaporate, they leave behind crusty areas of mineral deposits that are aesthetically disfiguring and difficult to remove. This is why a major part of the intern’s role is to ensure that these vulnerable works are suitably protected when on display. Regular cleanings of all of the sculptures and the application of thin, protective layers of wax to the bronze sculptures has become an essential part of the annual maintenance program of outdoors sculptures at the Hirshhorn. In some cases it is not necessary for us to apply the protective wax coating because an element of the artwork, such as a layer of paint, acts as the protective surface.
Figure 1. Corrosion, grime, and spider-webs on the underside of a painted steel sculpture
Figure 2. Corrosion on a painted steel sculpture
Although it is a delight to see creatures roaming throughout the sculpture garden, birds are rapidly becoming an unbeatable foe for this summer’s sculpture conservation interns. It seems just as quickly as a sculpture is cleaned of droppings; more birds come along to replace what has been removed. As aesthetically disrupting as bird droppings can be, they also pose a significant risk to the sculptures. Bird droppings are acidic and when left in place too long, they can etch into the metal, creating areas of uneven corrosion thus making the sculpture more difficult and complicated to treat. Bird droppings can also stain or etch painted surfaces, leaving disfiguring marks that are tough if not impossible to remove.
Figure 3. Bird droppings on a painted steel sculpture
The public also can erode sculptures, even if unwittingly. Despite explicit signage and a diligent security staff, sculptures can prove so enticing that some visitors are tempted to touch and even climb on them. While the sculptures are meant to be enjoyed by the public, human interactions can be very damaging. The cumulative impact of thousands of finger and hand prints can rub away the artist’s finish. Natural oils, sunscreen, and lotions react poorly with paints and waxes, and jewelry and clothing can easily scratch a sculpture’s delicate surface. Less common, but often more damaging is vandalism such as graffiti which can result in the need for major treatment. When these types of incidents occur they can penetrate the protective layer (wax or painted surface) which will allow the elements to interact with the underlying metal causing corrosion and possibly structural damage. Public outreach is proving to be a rewarding aspect of our time in the sculpture garden as we speak to inquiring visitors about our work. These conversations help educate visitors about the importance of conservation and the negative impacts of physical interactions with artwork.
Figure 4. Graffiti scratched into the surface of a painted steel sculpture
Figure 5. Scratches on the surface of a painted steel sculpture caused by the abrasive clothing of climbing visitors
With each sculpture we examine, document, and clean, as interns we are witnessing how each of these risks can be manifested in different ways, and how the work of past interns has successfully prevented damage and helped maintain the beauty of the Hirshhorn Museum sculpture garden.
Top: Alexander Calder, “Sky Hooks,” 1962

hirshhornconservation:

All sculptures begin to change from the moment the object leaves the artist’s studio. In the case of outdoor works, natural aging and the physical impact of light, temperature, humidity, air pollution, and handling all take their toll. Nonetheless, there are many benefits to viewing works of art outdoors; visitors can experience the works in a unique context in combination with foliage, architecture and even the weather. While viewing sculpture in an outdoor context can bring new meaning and depth to the visitors’ experience, these benefits must be navigated relative to the risks the works face from the effects of the elements, animals, and human interactions. Much of the Hirshhorn Museum’s outdoor sculpture conservation internship may at first sight appear to be routine, but the preventative measures that we carry out are essential in minimizing deterioration.

It may be surprising that massive sculptures made of steel or bronze are vulnerable to the elements. Yet, when bare metals are exposed to moisture and air pollution, corrosion can begin, gradually weakening and degrading the metal and putting the sculpture at risk from structural failure. Rain water can also pool in low areas and crevices and, as pools evaporate, they leave behind crusty areas of mineral deposits that are aesthetically disfiguring and difficult to remove. This is why a major part of the intern’s role is to ensure that these vulnerable works are suitably protected when on display. Regular cleanings of all of the sculptures and the application of thin, protective layers of wax to the bronze sculptures has become an essential part of the annual maintenance program of outdoors sculptures at the Hirshhorn. In some cases it is not necessary for us to apply the protective wax coating because an element of the artwork, such as a layer of paint, acts as the protective surface.

Figure 1. Corrosion, grime, and spider-webs on the underside of a painted steel sculpture

Figure 2. Corrosion on a painted steel sculpture

Although it is a delight to see creatures roaming throughout the sculpture garden, birds are rapidly becoming an unbeatable foe for this summer’s sculpture conservation interns. It seems just as quickly as a sculpture is cleaned of droppings; more birds come along to replace what has been removed. As aesthetically disrupting as bird droppings can be, they also pose a significant risk to the sculptures. Bird droppings are acidic and when left in place too long, they can etch into the metal, creating areas of uneven corrosion thus making the sculpture more difficult and complicated to treat. Bird droppings can also stain or etch painted surfaces, leaving disfiguring marks that are tough if not impossible to remove.

Figure 3. Bird droppings on a painted steel sculpture

The public also can erode sculptures, even if unwittingly. Despite explicit signage and a diligent security staff, sculptures can prove so enticing that some visitors are tempted to touch and even climb on them. While the sculptures are meant to be enjoyed by the public, human interactions can be very damaging. The cumulative impact of thousands of finger and hand prints can rub away the artist’s finish. Natural oils, sunscreen, and lotions react poorly with paints and waxes, and jewelry and clothing can easily scratch a sculpture’s delicate surface. Less common, but often more damaging is vandalism such as graffiti which can result in the need for major treatment. When these types of incidents occur they can penetrate the protective layer (wax or painted surface) which will allow the elements to interact with the underlying metal causing corrosion and possibly structural damage. Public outreach is proving to be a rewarding aspect of our time in the sculpture garden as we speak to inquiring visitors about our work. These conversations help educate visitors about the importance of conservation and the negative impacts of physical interactions with artwork.

Figure 4. Graffiti scratched into the surface of a painted steel sculpture

Figure 5. Scratches on the surface of a painted steel sculpture caused by the abrasive clothing of climbing visitors

With each sculpture we examine, document, and clean, as interns we are witnessing how each of these risks can be manifested in different ways, and how the work of past interns has successfully prevented damage and helped maintain the beauty of the Hirshhorn Museum sculpture garden.

Top: Alexander Calder, “Sky Hooks,” 1962



oldbonesanddust:

contentloveknowles:

Chicago’s lefthandedwave    E 7th St Austin, Texas  July 4, 2014

invading austin with pickle spears! xx


hirshhorn:

The Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden displays approximately 46 outdoor sculptures on the Plaza and in the Garden made of various materials, most predominantly bronze, but also painted steel, chrome-plated metals, and even glass. Although many of these sculptures were intended to be displayed outdoors, the materials are still susceptible to damage from the weather, wildlife and visitors. As a result, each object requires annual maintenance to protect the materials from their environment. In 1983, the Museum created an internship program with the dual goals of caring for the outdoor collection and educating pre-program conservation students about the specific needs of outdoor sculpture (Pre-program interns qualify as students who are working to fulfill the rigorous pre-requisites in chemistry, art history, and studio art and the required experience hours in conservation prior to their acceptance into graduate school for conservation). Each summer, interns work closely with staff conservators to address the annual maintenance of the collection on-site as well as at off-site locations such as Anne-Marie Gardens in Solomons Island, Maryland, where 23 sculptures are on long-term loan.
These labor-intensive treatments begin with photographic documentation of each sculpture in order to assess changes that have occurred to the artwork throughout the year. In the case of metal-alloy sculptures—the bulk of the collection—it is necessary to protect their surfaces from a wide range of damaging elements. Dust can scratch and abrade the metal; handling by visitors leaves behind aggressive oils that etch the metal surfaces over time; and atmospheric pollutants which, when combined with moisture, cause corrosion.   The first step in caring for these works is to wash them with a non-ionic surfactant to remove any surface accumulations. The sculptures are next heated and a layer of micro-crystalline wax is applied. The heating helps the wax layer to penetrate more deeply into the pores of the metal.  This wax layer must then be buffed in order to create an even and thin protective barrier against moisture and aggressive elements.
While the wax treatment is effective for approximately one year and needs to be conducted annually, the protective layer of wax can be severely compromised by constant touching  by  visitors which accelerates the degradation of the protective wax barrier. This is why interns frequently take the opportunity to communicate and educate the public both about conservation and the importance of the “no touching” rule.
Figure 1. Interns Leah and Tim wash a painted steel sculpture.
This year, the internship program is separated into two 12-week sessions. This blog will document many of the interesting treatments and conservation topics approached by the interns. The first session welcomes Caitlin Richeson, Leah Bright, and Tim Linden. 
Caitlin graduated in 2012 from the Maryland Institute College of Art with a BFA in Art History, Criticism and Theory with a concentration in Curatorial Studies. She has previously completed pre-program internships with the Naval History and Heritage Command’s Underwater Archaeology Branch and Colonial Williamsburg Foundation’s Archaeological Artifacts Conservation Lab as well as with the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden. After this year she hopes to enter into a graduate program in art conservation. 
Originally from Fairbanks, Alaska, Leah, graduated from the University of Oregon in 2010 with degrees in Art History and Spanish, and she has completed several pre-program conservation internships throughout the Smithsonian Institute since 2011.  This fall she will begin a master’s program in art conservation at the Winterthur University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation. 
Tim is originally from California where he graduated from the University of Southern California with a BFA in studio arts and a BA in interdisciplinary archaeology. He recently worked for a private conservation company and with artist Liz Larner, and  also worked in both Guatemala and Peru on archaeological excavations. After this year, he also hopes to obtain a graduate degree in art conservation.
Figure 2. Interns Caitlin, Leah and Tim buff a recently applied wax barrier layer.

hirshhorn:

The Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden displays approximately 46 outdoor sculptures on the Plaza and in the Garden made of various materials, most predominantly bronze, but also painted steel, chrome-plated metals, and even glass. Although many of these sculptures were intended to be displayed outdoors, the materials are still susceptible to damage from the weather, wildlife and visitors. As a result, each object requires annual maintenance to protect the materials from their environment. In 1983, the Museum created an internship program with the dual goals of caring for the outdoor collection and educating pre-program conservation students about the specific needs of outdoor sculpture (Pre-program interns qualify as students who are working to fulfill the rigorous pre-requisites in chemistry, art history, and studio art and the required experience hours in conservation prior to their acceptance into graduate school for conservation). Each summer, interns work closely with staff conservators to address the annual maintenance of the collection on-site as well as at off-site locations such as Anne-Marie Gardens in Solomons Island, Maryland, where 23 sculptures are on long-term loan.

These labor-intensive treatments begin with photographic documentation of each sculpture in order to assess changes that have occurred to the artwork throughout the year. In the case of metal-alloy sculptures—the bulk of the collection—it is necessary to protect their surfaces from a wide range of damaging elements. Dust can scratch and abrade the metal; handling by visitors leaves behind aggressive oils that etch the metal surfaces over time; and atmospheric pollutants which, when combined with moisture, cause corrosion.   The first step in caring for these works is to wash them with a non-ionic surfactant to remove any surface accumulations. The sculptures are next heated and a layer of micro-crystalline wax is applied. The heating helps the wax layer to penetrate more deeply into the pores of the metal.  This wax layer must then be buffed in order to create an even and thin protective barrier against moisture and aggressive elements.

While the wax treatment is effective for approximately one year and needs to be conducted annually, the protective layer of wax can be severely compromised by constant touching  by  visitors which accelerates the degradation of the protective wax barrier. This is why interns frequently take the opportunity to communicate and educate the public both about conservation and the importance of the “no touching” rule.

Figure 1. Interns Leah and Tim wash a painted steel sculpture.Figure 1. Interns Leah and Tim wash a painted steel sculpture.

This year, the internship program is separated into two 12-week sessions. This blog will document many of the interesting treatments and conservation topics approached by the interns. The first session welcomes Caitlin Richeson, Leah Bright, and Tim Linden

Caitlin graduated in 2012 from the Maryland Institute College of Art with a BFA in Art History, Criticism and Theory with a concentration in Curatorial Studies. She has previously completed pre-program internships with the Naval History and Heritage Command’s Underwater Archaeology Branch and Colonial Williamsburg Foundation’s Archaeological Artifacts Conservation Lab as well as with the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden. After this year she hopes to enter into a graduate program in art conservation. 

Originally from Fairbanks, Alaska, Leah, graduated from the University of Oregon in 2010 with degrees in Art History and Spanish, and she has completed several pre-program conservation internships throughout the Smithsonian Institute since 2011.  This fall she will begin a master’s program in art conservation at the Winterthur University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation. 

Tim is originally from California where he graduated from the University of Southern California with a BFA in studio arts and a BA in interdisciplinary archaeology. He recently worked for a private conservation company and with artist Liz Larner, and  also worked in both Guatemala and Peru on archaeological excavations. After this year, he also hopes to obtain a graduate degree in art conservation.

Figure 2. Interns Caitlin, Leah and Tim buff a recently applied wax barrier layer.
Figure 2. Interns Caitlin, Leah and Tim buff a recently applied wax barrier layer.

(Source: hirshhornconservation)


so-treu:

from89:

The Sentinels by Chakaia Booker

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sarahspy:

Diego Rivera kissing Frida Kahlo while at work under scaffolding at the Detroit Institute of The Arts, 1932
(via)

sarahspy:

Diego Rivera kissing Frida Kahlo while at work under scaffolding at the Detroit Institute of The Arts, 1932

(via)

(via crankyskirt)


scalesofperception:

Benois House | NPS Tchoban Voss | Via

Human figures can also take away scale.

SoP | Scale of Environments


fastcompany:

This Artist Is Filling In Chicago’s Potholes With Mosaics
So far, the Chicago Department of Transportation has let Bachor’s public artworks slide. When the Chicago Tribune sought comment from the city agency, they didn’t see Bachor’s alternative pothole repair method as much of a threat. “Mr. Bachor and his art are proof that even the coldest, harshest winter can not darken the spirits of Chicagoans,” CDOT told the paper.
Slideshow>

fastcompany:

This Artist Is Filling In Chicago’s Potholes With Mosaics

So far, the Chicago Department of Transportation has let Bachor’s public artworks slide. When the Chicago Tribune sought comment from the city agency, they didn’t see Bachor’s alternative pothole repair method as much of a threat. “Mr. Bachor and his art are proof that even the coldest, harshest winter can not darken the spirits of Chicagoans,” CDOT told the paper.

Slideshow>

(via gapers)